CyberNotes
Tutorial Thursday




Wouldn’t it be cool if there was a way for you to dominate those “shoot the monkey” ads that popup all over the place? Just imagine all of the fame and glory you would receive from your friends! You just need one tool to get the job done… a mouse auto-clicker.

On a more serious note having something that can automatically click the mouse buttons can actually be handy. Maybe you’re trying to test the way an application operates, or maybe you’re playing an intense game that requires excessive clicking. It doesn’t really matter what you’re reasoning is, but if you need to click the mouse at regular (and somewhat insane) intervals we’ve got the application for you.

AutoClick is a freeware Windows application that requires absolutely no installation. Once you have downloaded it and get it running you should see a screen similar to this:

autoclick.png

–Automated Clicking–

To get started you should start by playing around with single-task automated clicking. This will simulate the clicking of the mouse in a single area on the screen, and if you enable the Freeze Pointer option the position you specify will remain constant even if you move the mouse.

Here are the steps needed to automate the clicking of a single point on the screen:

  1. In the settings specify what kind of clicks you want performed (left/right/middle and single/double), and also the interval at which the clicks should occur. Optionally you can limit how many clicks should be performed.
  2. Hover your mouse over the area on the screen where you want the auto-clicking to be performed.
  3. To start the auto-clicking press the F3 key.
  4. To stop the auto-clicking at anytime press the F3 key.

–Smart Clicking–

Smart Clicking is a little more advanced because you can specify multiple “hotspots” that will be clicked at any given interval.

Here are the steps needed to automate the clicking of multiple points on the screen:

  1. In the settings specify what kind of clicks you want performed (left/right/middle and single/double), and also the interval at which the clicks should occur. Optionally you can limit how many clicks should be performed.
  2. Press the F4 key to begin recording the click positions. Click and drag the Record button onto the area(s) you wanted to be clicked. The cursor should turn into blue crosshairs while you are dragging the Record button:
    autoclick record.png
  3. Repeat Step 2 for each of the areas that you wish to be clicked. When you’re done press the F4 key again.
  4. Check the Smart Click box in the settings to enable the playback of the clicks you just recorded, and then press F3 to start the auto-clicking. You should see it rotate through all of the areas you selected in Step 2.
  5. To stop the auto-clicking at anytime press the F3 key.

–Overview–

A tool like this can definitely save some time, and I was actually having some fun seeing what it looked like when clicking the mouse every 1/1000th of a second. It could actually make for a fun prank, too. Did I say that out loud? ;)