CyberNotes
Fun Friday

It’s hard to imagine what life was like before the Internet, isn’t it? I’ve been using it for more than half of my life, but today’s generation of kids grew up with it. Those are the kids that don’t even know the difference between life before and after the Internet came along, but I’m sure you can remember the differences, like…

  1. Balancing your checkbook required waiting for your statement to come from the bank because there was no online banking access
  2. Along the same lines, if you wanted money to be transfered from your checking to your savings account or visa-versa, you had to physically walk into the bank to do it instead of quickly logging into your online account…
  3. You actually knew all of your friends in “real-life.” There weren’t “virtual” friends or people you call friends but have never met
  4. To communicate with friends and family who lived far away, you hand-wrote letters and mailed them through the Post Office
  5. Google and Yahoo didn’t exist which meant researching was done with the help of books
  6. You received the weather forecast on TV, from the newspaper, or even over the phone…
  7. Planning a vacation meant going to see a travel agent to have them arrange the flight, tours and hotel stays
  8. You called 411 or used a phone book to look-up telephone numbers
  9. Finding out who won a sporting event that you missed meant waiting for the next day’s newspaper to arrive at your doorstep
  10. There was no way to track a package that was being delivered to you via UPS or FedEx, you simply had to be patient
  11. When you had something you wanted to sell, you ran an ad in the newspaper and hoped someone in the area would be interested because there was no eBay or Craigslist
  12. Finding out the show-times for movies at the local theater meant calling their pre-recorded message and listening through the whole thing to hear what movies were playing and at what time, or just showing up at the theater and seeing what was playing
  13. To get human interaction, you went to physically visit your friends instead of chatting in forums or leaving messages on message boards
  14. Keeping an account of what was going on in your life meant writing it out on paper with a pen or pencil instead of keeping an online blog or journal
  15. Watching a home-video or sharing it with friends meant you needed a VCR, there was no YouTube or other video sharing services
  16. Buying music required going to a physical store and purchasing a cassette tape or a CD and playing it in your Walkman or Boom-box, there was no iTunes
  17. Talking to multiple friends at the same time required that you be in the same room, this was what life was like before instant messaging…
  18. No one had heard of the terms “Identity Theft” or “Phishing”
  19. The only way to pay bills was to mail them or maybe pay using a check over the phone because online bill-pay wasn’t an option…
  20. Finding a book at the library meant searching through the little cards in the card catalogue and not using an online system

After looking through this list, it really makes me thankful at how far we’ve come! I can’t imagine needing to wait for a newspaper to arrive to get the news or needing to walk into a Travel Agent’s office to plan a trip. Even worse is the thought of physically mailing all of my communication between friends and family, we really are spoiled with email, aren’t we?

This beginning part of this Chris Pirillo video is kinda humorous and fits in well to today’s topic, so take a look:

There Are 57 Comments

  1. Sadly, I don’t remember life without internet (yes, I am that young). Haha! But this post reminded me of a 24 (the TV show) spoof. It was something like “what if 24 happened in 1994″.

  2. Life without internet was boring. Climbin’ on trees, playing with other kids. Quite awful :(

  3. Michael Dobrofsky
    unset wrote:
    Life without internet was boring. Climbin’ on trees, playing with other kids. Quite awful :(

    I hope that is sarcasm! Jeez, if not, it must show my age :( Life before the net was so damn good, nothing the net can “do” would ever come close, guys. Yes, it IS sad that some don’t remember, or were too young to have known. If I could go back to the 1980s, I would in a heartbeat. If you wanna make fun of that, do your worst :P

    • Here, here, I’m with you. I remember riding our bikes for miles and miles to visit friends, playing outside, swimming in the local waterhole, making tree houses, making go-carts with old mower wheeels,going on picnics,singing and dancing with my friends to ABBA and Queen, playing in the rain and the mud…. We had a great time! Children of today don’t know what they’re missing out on.

    • I agree with everything you said.. it’s crazy how much we rely on this crap now.. I use to have so much fun when I was a kid playing in the woods and exploring and I’m 27.. We didn’t get internet until I was like 14 and then I did it and that’s when HELL started.. I miss the old days when people wanted to really get to know you instead of using the internet… I mean hell far they still print off phone books and people don’t even use them anymore and it’s a waste of trees.. lol

  4. I really wouldn’t want to go back to the eighties. I like life as it is now!

    What I do miss of the things mentioned in the article, is flipping through the cards in a library. I really liked that :D

  5. This is indeed an excellent video by Chris Pirillo.  There has been a lot of controversy over the validity of Wikipedia’s information.  I think it ‘s an unfair statement.  As Pirillo said, “there is no such thing a total truth”“Truth changes over time”.  

    We are the ones who discover our own truth through critical research and critical thinking.  We can than say, “we are close to the truth”   Britannica is an excellent source of information, but by all means, it’s not the only information resource, no matter what the elitists may say.

    I’m 61 years old, and I can surely remember those good ole times when the Internet was nonexistent.  They were good and sweet like a Hawaiian pineapple.  Would I want to go back?  Yes and no.  As everything in life, there is no total black or total whiteness—different shades of gray are part of life too.  Living in an Internet world has a lot of goodies too.  Like reading this blog and sending this comment to all of you guys.  To me that’s great and can only be done with the Internet in real time.

    • “there is no such thing a total truth”
      “as” = Truth.

      Pwnd? Is that what the kids are calling it these days? :D

      I’m just pulling your leg. ;)

    • I agree with you 100%, but I think if given the choice I would have preferred the internet never caught on with ordinary people. While it has a lot to offer as far as gathering information, and instant mail, and entertainment when we have nothing to do, it has greatly diminished real life human interaction.

      One area that has been hit very hard is the gay community. Before the internet, I remember having to actually go out to gay bars and clubs, or get involved with gay groups or activities to actually meet people. The bar scene was much more fun because of it, and people actually knew how to chat, I mean really chat. And because people couldn’t just sit at home if they wanted to meet someone, well…there was the phone chat lines and personal ads in the paper or magazines, even people that really didn’t like to drink would go out. The bars and clubs were busier, and there was a more diverse crowd there. Today many of these clubs that I remember being the hot place to go, are barely hanging on, and many of the low key or lesser popular venues are closed. Many people these days will sit on-line and “meet” people. Having done the on-line thing, I can attest to it not being nearly as satisfying. People post fake or photo-shopped pics, lie about who they really are, and are mainly interested in just getting someone to come over for a quickie. There is a lost art in actually going out and meeting people, and if you wanted a on-nighter, the art of seduction. And even if you were talking to someone that was telling you total lies about themselves, you could still see the real person, read their body language, dissect what they were telling you, and afterwards, ask your friends if they know him, or anything about him. People couldn’t be as fake.

      In other areas of life, I will say I miss actually calling an airline and speaking to a real life reservation agent and not being charged a fee for doing it, I miss having the JCPenny and Sears catalog delivered 4 times a year, I miss having to actually go out in the real world and do business with real people, and forging personal relationships with the sales people and business owners. The internet (and txt messaging too), for all it has to offer, is slowly killing the necessity for humans to be really human.

  6. Ahh yes. I remember the days in University of spending hours in the library and then hauling a dozen reference books home to write that term paper. You would only spend 10 minutes on email because people couldn’t send you cutesy pictures through PINE. And browsing the text-based BBS’s in Lynx. Then of course, you would head outside and climb a tree because there was nothing else to do, as noted by unset.

    Lemme tell ya – there has been many a day when I’ve been tempted to go Amish and throw out every piece of electronic gadgetry that I own.

  7. Also we didn’t have the 200-300 channels on TV. Satellite dishes were the size of a VW Bug (Beetle). Cell phones that weren’t hardwired into your car were huge and very expensive.

  8. The Guru wrote:
    Cell phones that weren’t hardwired into your car were huge and very expensive.

    LOL. I remember selling the old Motorola bagphones that were nearly $1000 and airtime cost upwards of $1.00 per minute.

  9. #9 is kinda stretching it. ESPN was around well before the internet.

    #12 isn’t totally true. I remember looking through the paper to check for movie listings before the internet was around.

    Ugh, and I remember using Encyclopedia’s to do research for school. Such awful times. I’m so glad that only lasted up until I was in around 2nd or 3rd grade, though :D.

  10. Ahh the good old days! Man, sometimes you don’t realize how much life has changed (gee I’m starting to get old). I do remember all that, but it’s further away in my memory than I thought.

    I remember we only had 3 TV channels. Showing video was a happening and happened only once a year at most. We played large tapes or LPs. We would have fun with marbles, sand, setting things on fire ;) We played with miniature cars, lego. I’ve been outside most of the time in those days.. until I got a computer. Sad really. Just like kiltboy I sometimes think about going amish. I wonder if the ones who don’t know life without the internet ever think about that..

  11. The Guru wrote:
    Also we didn’t have the 200-300 channels on TV. Satellite dishes were the size of a VW Bug (Beetle). Cell phones that weren’t hardwired into your car were huge and very expensive.

    Every once in a while you’ll still see the satellite dishes that are the size of a VW bug which is kinda humorous. :)

    kiltboy wrote:
    The Guru wrote:
    Cell phones that weren’t hardwired into your car were huge and very expensive.

    LOL. I remember selling the old Motorola bagphones that were nearly $1000 and airtime cost upwards of $1.00 per minute.

    A Motorola bagphone was the first phone I ever remember my parents owning, and we thought it was so cool! How funny it is to think about carrying around a bag just for a phone these days…

    kiltboy wrote:
    Ahh yes. I remember the days in University of spending hours in the library and then hauling a dozen reference books home to write that term paper. You would only spend 10 minutes on email because people couldn’t send you cutesy pictures through PINE. And browsing the text-based BBS’s in Lynx. Then of course, you would head outside and climb a tree because there was nothing else to do, as noted by unset.

    Lemme tell ya – there has been many a day when I’ve been tempted to go Amish and throw out every piece of electronic gadgetry that I own.

    Going “Amish” for a few days might be good for all of us! While it’s nice to think about how far we’ve come and how much easier technology has made some things, in other ways it was nice to not have the distraction of the Internet or cell phones.

    • i am old enough to remember life before the intyrnet
      some gains and many losses
      the world is a lonelier place I miss phone calls and mostly human face to face interaction
      tire of texting constantly being attached to a a pc or iphone to check messages etc
      its a good business tool but I really feel it has created barriers between people
      also there are always crashes tech problems and its damned expensive!!!!!!!!!!
      a facebook friend how cheap a friendship is that how callow shallow

  12. Ashley wrote:
    The Guru wrote:
    Also we didn’t have the 200-300 channels on TV. Satellite dishes were the size of a VW Bug (Beetle). Cell phones that weren’t hardwired into your car were huge and very expensive.

    Every once in a while you’ll still see the satellite dishes that are the size of a VW bug which is kinda humorous. :)

    I remember form the days back in Hawthorne people would mount those giant things on their roofs. I also remember back in those days to we have CompuServe and other BBS. Didn’t really do much with the Internet until we came out here in 1993 and then 56K modem was considered fast.

  13. With 54 years in my background, I certainly remember my 34 years before the Internet’s birth !

    There’s no heaven on Earth, right ? That includes the Web ! The best IMO is the worldwide communication it allows, comes next access to a planetary library, and third Web services.

    The worst is, as always, the alternative to the best, but that’s more specific of life as a whole. What would rather call my attention is that, if democracy remains the best system, it also remains the best tool to brainwash, and that freedom goes much further than the simple right to oppose oneself : it calls upon our will to stay critic of global mass fashions as well. Not sure the younger ones are not at risk of loosing their identity in a universal pea soup…

    Otherwise, Hemingway did write his novels with paper and a pencil, and who is (remains) able to extract a square root without a calculator ?

    The risk is in developing the intelligence of the user, and the brain laziness it may lead to.

  14. Transcontinental wrote:
    Otherwise, Hemingway did write his novels with paper and a pencil, and who is (remains) able to extract a square root without a calculator ?

    The risk is in developing the intelligence of the user, and the brain laziness it may lead to.

    I see what you’re saying here, that sometimes we don’t use our brains as much as we should/could because of the technology that’s around us like calculators. However, on the other hand, think about how much information we have access to and how much we’re able to learn because of technology. I believe for myself at least, that my brain is full of more knowledge today because of browsing the Internet and sites like Wikipedia, National Geographic, and even Google Maps, than it would be if technology didn’t exist. Of course there’s also software that we have access to that broadens our knowledge as well. We may use our brains less for some things, but we use them more for other things, so it all balances out.

  15. Plus we can deal with more complicated things due to technology, and develop faster. I too get what you’re saying, but I’m not sure yet if it’s a bad development. It will have been if all that technology will once disappear, because we’d have to start from scratch again, more or less :P

  16. duuuuude payphones were the BOMB!!!!! :lol:

  17. and they are still much needed. everyone doesn’t have a cell phone. and the calls don’t need to be 50 cents, they ned to be a nickle because the average person who needs to use a payphone doesn’t have fifty cents to begin with.

    • and many require cards and most dont work
      when my iphone crashed i experienced life with no phone for one day
      i feel for poor people in our high tech society
      or maybe the internet should be FREE

  18. Remember when being “out” was truely being out!? It’s sad that we are reachable at every second of the day.

    To me, life before the Internet was true Freedom. Sadly, it’s gone forever.

  19. I founc the internet quite refreshing when it first went mainstream back in the mid to late 1990s. That was also before cellphones went mainstream. Now everyone is constantly linked to the internet and the phone because of the smart phones that are out now and we ain’t seen nothing yet. Yes it’s made information and staying connected a whole lot easier BUT it’s taken the fun out of going out and doing one’s own thing. There’s no escape. There’s always an electronic leash connecting you to everyone you know. I don’t like it. Not only do I long for the days before the internet and the cellphone alike …. I also long for the day before jamboxes and cable television went mainstream.

  20. Once the internet came into being the quality of music on mainstream radio went to crap. I remember when music used to be good. Nowadays the music industry promotes the lowest common denominator. one actually needs the internet in order to discover new music that’s actually enjoyable to listen to. It’s unfortuante. Likewise, the quality of television has gone down. Having about 3 to 5 channels had more more substance that the 100 channels that cable and satelite provides now. Cell phones keep people from interacting with one another face to face. It’s made life less personable and less polite. I long for the 60s and early 90s. They were better times that’s for sure.

  21. the internet is good for education purposes and speed of getting things done but I absolutely hate the venom it spews from people. Until all these blogs came along I never thought everyone was this angry. It was better in many ways before the internet. I don’t need to know or hear all the nasty comments that people voice. No wonder we are in such turmoil!

    • So agree with you! Perfectly said! And how about that Facebook, huh?

      People fighting on Facebook but can’t converse or settle their differences in person.

      Wow.

  22. I was born in 1996, but I haven’t been introduced to the Internet until I was about 8 (in 2004). Even though I was introduced to the Internet a few years later than most of my friends, it’s still a VERY important part of my life. :) I can’t live without it. Seriously.

    I’m one of the few people my age (I’m 14) who actually CAN remember life before the Internet. Oh, how unlucky I was back then ;)

  23. I was born in ’88 and I certainly remember life before many of our technologies became mainstream. I didn’t really start using the internet until I started to get specific assignments that required an online database resource. A cellphone didn’t make its way into my pocket until I was 17 and a senior in high school. I enjoyed using it, but now, it has become more of a required evil. Evading certain people was much easier. Hehe. I both enjoy and am saddened by my/the world’s dependency on our cellphones, wi-fi, and the like. Many are the memories I have of playing tag, hide and seek, red rover, etc with the neighborhood kids, of climbing trees, camping out, and hiking up mountains with friends and loved ones. Many of those things are still enjoyed today, by however fewer people, but the conveniences granted by technology have also grown to be responsibilities and therefore really have become invisible leashes. It is the nature of the world and of people to change constantly, but we must keep those changes in check.

  24. As usual, whenever someone mentions the internet a handful of troglodytes have to come out from under their rock and project their insecurities on other people. That old saying rings true, there are two sorts of people in the World: Winners and Whiners.

  25. People, you are connected to an electronic leash because you allowed yourself to become connected.

    I am 27 years old and live in America. I do not own a tv, cell phone or computer (currently using my friends).

    Your work requires you to remain connected to said leash? Well, no one forced you to into your line of work. I quit my 50k a year job and simplified my life. Now, I earn enough to survive and put a little away for the future, which is always uncertain. Working extremely hard for 4 decades just to enjoy the remaining 2? That is absurd. I enjoy every day of my life. I spend almost all my free-time outdoors with my dog or with my friends. My only 2 forms of electronic entertainment are my home phone and $50, used stereo.

    Drop your “keep up with the Joneses” mentality, release yourself from your consumerism leash and enjoy your life. You are victims of aggressive marketing that suggests that you can never be satisfied. Think outside the box and realize that most people on Earth do not have or need a fraction of what you currently own, and they are happy.

    Will it be challenging? You bet. Will you fall victim of judgemental people who will call you poor and foolish? Of course. Just remember, the poor and rich alike will eventually be picking carrots with a stepladder. Stop making your lives more complicated.

    • Amen, brother! I couldn’t agree with you more! To me, material things don’t even matter. I’ve been suffering from poverty and deprivation all my life, because of my mental illness, which has adversely affected my ability to make a living.

      Even though I have internet access now, I know that there are some who believe that the internet cannot and will not last forever, due to evolving global economic and ecological conditions, which now seem to be turning for the worse. I, IMHO, don’t think the internet will go away soon, but who knows what the future holds? If and when the ‘net DOES disappear, I know that I…we ALL…must be prepared. I’m old enough (48 years old) to remember life before the internet, so when/if “the bottom drops out” I don’t think I’m going to mourn the ‘net when it’s gone…instead, I’m gonna feel rather…LIBERATED! ;-)

    • I like you a lot! Smiling! You are so right. Omg! So right.

  26. …. so technology means we have lost or freedom?… well, on my mobile, laptop and ipad there is a button labeled “off” and i can use it when i please! :)

  27. The irony is that we are more rushed and stressed than ever, yet these products were designed to make life easier.

    We are miserable as a society. We are overweight, overmedicated and always running low on time. We are also less social, even with all of these social networks you can find on the internet.

    If I hear one more person tell me they would die without their mobile-phone, I will vomit.

    There is talk that the recession is reversing the effect that the baby boomers created. I have yet to see a less material-obsessed society developing.

    • Yes, we are. When I leave my cell at home I actually don’t mind it. I don’t have time to call anyone back anyway.

  28. One more comment about technology before I go:

    I was visiting my family the other day and everyone was either watching television, texting, or surfing the internet.

    A storm developed and knocked the power out for 2 hours. Within 10 minutes of the power outage, all of my family members were involved in conversation with one another. We even retrieved an old board game from the closet and began playing. Everyone kept stating how much they enjoyed interacting on such a personal level. All of us also stated how much we missed personal interaction.

    Less than 5 minutes after the power was restored, we were all back to secluding ourselves and staring at our screens.

  29. Well we could kinda “download” free music.. just had to wait for your song to come on the radio n have your finger close to the record button. But I can’t say I was entirely deprived of online interaction during the first 1/3 of my life.. there were always BBS’s when I was a kid to run up my ma’s phone bill with.

  30. I’m 31 & didnt start using Internet til I was 19. anyway, I had heard of identity theft before internet because that’s supposedly what could happen if someone stole your social security card. And you could track a package, but you’d have to take the paper to the post office and let them look it up.

  31. “After looking through this list, it really makes me thankful at how far we’ve come! I can’t imagine needing to wait for a newspaper to arrive to get the news or needing to walk into a Travel Agent’s office to plan a trip. Even worse is the thought of physically mailing all of my communication between friends and family, we really are spoiled with email, aren’t we?”

    WOW, you’re a true idiot for saying that after everything else you’ve written – convenience really does kill intellect.

  32. the music industry would be great without the internet

  33. I´m 26 and surely remember the days without internet/real computer.
    I´ve read the article and all the comments and want to come with a conclusion.
    The time without internet was a strange one compared to today. It had its ups and its downs.
    The downside was listed here already so I just add some things or explain them more.
    Life was a lot more personal and complicated than today.
    We all were much “poorer” compared to today.
    I mean, sometimes you had to wait the whole day to record a specific song from your favourite band.
    There there times when one wouldnt speak to some friends like for months. Writing letters, one tried to write it down correctly and polite. It also costed money and one did not want to offend anyone for no reason… there was no real anonymity thats why.
    Sometimes it could take weeks or months until you heard it again. And most of times you never got the whole Song. It gave you a thrill to “catch” the song. Rewinding the cassete to listen to the song again was again something you had to do, I mean one always had to wait.
    One could and had to enjoy this song for a long time, because you had not “youtube” or other stuff like today in wich you can find another great song much faster than having to listen to the radio and waiting to be lucky.
    What I want to stress out is that it was a life that often laid on you some kind of loneliness and you held you back from all kinds of information.
    Today all kind of information, may it be music, or chatting on your free day 16 hours a day without pause, playing games online, reading all kinds of stuff, with the internet there is always something to do and its all linked to the computer and occupies so much of our time if we let it to.

    So I want to say, that after being drawn to the internet much, its like listening to the same song for the 1000th time, it wont give you the kick anymore. I feel that we as human beings are bound to enjoy periods of rest. Its so much more fun to watch a movie and just lay down and think about it and let the atmosphere surround you than to jump into a forum into a new discussion. For me it feels like our brain cant take in so much of information, it just burns out and one will have to take a serious amounts of rest to get the old feelings back. The same goes for music, relationships, everything that there is. I also stopped being available on chats the whole day, I want to control my life and not being controled by life. The internet has a lot to offer, but I think we have to decide how much we want to take from it. And the biggest think to learn is to care more for reality, real interactions, real time so one can integrate the “digital fantasyworld” in it.

  34. im a dotorgasaurus

  35. Folks, I’m 37, and I remember life without the internet. I could repeat the statements made by others, but I can tell you that life was definitely simpler back then. The pace of life was slower, you received your news by newspaper or news program and received more in-depth treatment in magazines. ‘Reality’ wasn’t a type of television program … it was how and where everyone lived life. Everyone had one ‘life’ … there was no ‘real life’ and ‘virtual life’. I love hearing stories of how people, younger than myself obviously, ‘know’ what life was like before the internet when the internet was available to them at age three upward. At one of my previous jobs, in 2007, the internet went out at my workplace … and I’ve never seen more people in an absolute panic. (They went as far as to look up the IP address of Google so they could get _some_ internet!) IMHO, while I am an avid user of the internet, and I work in web development, I feel that there is a need to ‘disconnect’ every so often and free yourself from the shackles that the internet has tied us all down with. (My last vacation was to the beach, and I watched no television, brought no internet enabled devices, and brought no cell phone … and it was exhilarating!).

  36. I love modern technology, but I miss being able to be a casual “expert” at something.

    If you were really into something like sports, or movies you could wow your friends with your knowledge when the subject comes up during conversation….. now when you are by the internet, any hack can do a quick google search and find the same info.

    If you enjoyed music, and spent time and money collecting a large music library, and then impress your friends by making them mixed tapes…. now anyone can download whatever MP3s they want off the net cheap (or for free).

    If you enjoyed photography, and spent the time and effort to learn to take a great photo, you could wow your friends with your photo albums…. now with digital cameras, any hack can take 1,000 photos and one of them will liekly end up being impressive

    The list goes on and on…

  37. Somehow I get the impression that folks who nowadays spend most of their time online, with little to almost no interaction with other people at all, were probably the stay-at-home type back in the day, and rotted most of their days in front of their television set (even if there were only a few channels; there was cable). People who like to get out still get out, although they probably do more texting than actualu talking lol.

  38. Meh. I wasn’t that hard :/

  39. I remember life before the internet. A person’s social life actually involved talking to real life people, not seeing them on a skype video or typing to them in emails. The world’s morals have fallen greatly due to the wide spread of pornography, bad language, slander, violence, theft (ect)……….We have the internet to thank for our new decadent society. This is the life we’ve created for ourselves and our children. I don’t think it was worth it to save having to travel to the bank or wait for the newspaper delivery to find out what the latest news is.

  40. what a weird, weird article!!! What is this aimed at, 12 year olds?? Of course we remember, we’re not all senile nor all croaked yet, WTF???

    PS: #18: WRONG! You might want to replace “identity theft” by “spam”. If you never heard of ID theft before then, were you, by any chance, living in a TV-less, newspaper-less, radio-less bubble???

  41. A better article would have been “do you remember the internet before IP’s?” Some morons out there are completely clueless as to the fact there were no IPs back in the 90′s and everyone was completely anonymous and why cybercrime was rampant back then, and mostly untraceable!

  42. This seems to be written by someone around 30, and not a 40+ geezer like myself.

    It’s very hard to disentangle the effects of the internet from the effects of the feminist movement.

    The only upside is that we can’t say that either one of them is “single-handedly destroying human civilization”.

    Jointly these two phenomena have been a disaster…

  43. I think that the internet will be around for a long time, as will video games and cellphones and anything else electronic! This is the 21st Century, so you have to roll with the punches and get with the changes! sure, things may have been different back then without the technology(I know this and I’m 52 years old)but I do have a computer(Windows Vista-Dell)a few video game systems, a cell phone, an iPad, 4 electric guitars, etc, and I do enjoy them!

    Did you know the board games were the precursor of video games? And just about anybody can get on YouTube & be famous!

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