The second annual wave of Linux distribution waves is coming to an end, and there is no better way to wrap it up than with Fedora. The new Fedora 8 sports several new features, including built-in Compiz Fusion support for the GNOME desktop. You can enable Compiz Fusion in Fedora 8 by opening System ? Preferences ? Desktop Effects.

Fedora 8 has also improved laptop support in several different areas, including wireless (both Bluetooth and WiFi) and suspending/resuming. This is great news because most of the people I know who run Linux for personal use only have a laptop.

One of the best features in Fedora 8 has to be the PulseAudio integration. This is similar to Vista’s Volume Mixer, and Pieter gave us a heads up that Fedora would be including this by default. With it you can control the volume for individual applications and sound sources on your computer:

PulseAudio Volume Control

Is that it? Not even close. Fedora 8 users will also enjoy the following features:

  • This release features GNOME 2.20. GNOME now includes mail notification in the Evolution mail client, the ability to fill in PDF forms in the Evince document viewer, improved file management, a revamped Appearance control panel applet, a revised help system, and many other enhancements.
  • KDE 3.5.8 is available in the KDE Live image as well as the regular DVD. The KDE 4 (Beta) Development Environment is available in the repository.
  • CodecBuddy is now included, and promotes free, superior quality, open formats to end users trying to play multimedia content under patent encumbered or proprietary formats.
  • OpenOffice.org 2.3, with many new features, is available as part of Fedora 8.
  • Nodoka, a fresh new GNOME theme created specially for Fedora, is available in this release.
  • Live installations are faster and require a smaller root filesystem. The file system layout has also changed somewhat. System files for the Live images are now under LiveOS/, and a new README file has been provided as a short introduction to the live image.

Fedora 8 Homepage

There Are 10 Comments

  1. PulseAudio is really cool, I am glad that it made into Fedora 8.

  2. It’s definitely cool. I’m guessing that other distributions will also be jumping to add PulseAudio in their next releases.

  3. Yeah i would like to see this in the next releases of mandriva and ubuntu.

  4. It *is* coming to Ubuntu very soon, Tinhed. Be on the lookout for that when Ubuntu 8.04 drops in April 2008. :)

  5. thats great…ryan, is here a way to install any flavour of linux on my old p2 laptop from the hard disk? i tried installing ubuntu from the cd, but it got stuck in the very beginning….windows 98 installs fine without any problems…

  6. yeshu wrote:
    thats great…ryan, is here a way to install any flavour of linux on my old p2 laptop from the hard disk? i tried installing ubuntu from the cd, but it got stuck in the very beginning….windows 98 installs fine without any problems…

    You may run into the same problem with Fedora, but it wouldn’t hurt to try and install it on your machine. Linux always has relatively low system requirements to run so I wouldn’t think that you would have any issues. I’m guessing your biggest problem would be driver compatibility, and that is probably why Ubuntu ran into troubles.

  7. They’re working on it all the time though. I’ve been messing around with Linux many years before actually switching over and I’ve found out that Ubuntu is the only Linux-based OS that detects my WiFi card and all my other hardware. (For example: Freespire detected my WiFi card but not my graphic card! Imagine that…) Fedora 6 still didn’t support my WiFi card, nor did OpenSUSE 10.1!

    But hey, with so many hardware on the market, no people being able to work full-time on these projects, and almost no hardware manufacturers helping them, it may take a long while before Linux supports all hardware. Add to that that hardware manufacturers keep making new hardware and you’ll see why it’s so hard for volunteers to make all of this work.

  8. Ubuntu is one of the few distributions that support my wireless card as well. I wish that hardware manufacturers would jump on board the Linux development because that would help out a considerable amount.

  9. As long as Apple’s acting like Linux doesn’t exist and Microsoft is like “if you use Linux, you violate our patents so we’re going to sue you!”, that’s not going to happen.

  10. Pieter wrote:
    As long as Apple’s acting like Linux doesn’t exist and Microsoft is like “if you use Linux, you violate our patents so we’re going to sue you!”, that’s not going to happen.

    I tried not to laugh, but it’s just so true that it’s funny.

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