rocketmailDid you need another new email address? We didn’t think so, but you may be still interested to know that Yahoo has decided to add two new domains to their mail service. Today around 12:00 PM (Pacific), they will introduce Ymail and reintroduce RocketMail as new domains their users can use to register for new email accounts.




If RocketMail sounded familiar to you it’s because it was one of the first major webmail services available when email first became popular. It’s been too long, but I almost think at one point I even had a RocketMail account. Eventually Yahoo acquired them in 1997 and used their technology for Yahoo Mail. Now they’re reviving RocketMail by allowing users to sign up for an email account under the domain.

Why has Yahoo chosen now as the perfect moment to add two domains to their mail service? An article from the AFP points out how right now Yahoo is trying to prove to their followers and their investors that there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. Yahoo Mail is already the most popular web-based mail solution out there with millions of users, but adding new domains has it’s benefits. They say, “adding new domains is intended to let users who have outgrown or never really liked their yahoo.com email addresses to have chances at better choices.

Isn’t it a little ironic that they chose one of their domains to be Ymail, like Gmail? At least Ymail is short and sweet unlike Rocketmail which seems a little long, doesn’t it? While Hotmail is a little long, Microsoft introduced the @live.com domain not that long ago which is short and sweet as well. It’s also worth pointing out that Yahoo has used Ymail before for an email service for mobile devices.

Remember, today at 12 PM Pacific, you’ll have a chance to scoop up the address of your choice. If your current user ID is something long with a bunch of numbers attached to it, it’ll be a great opportunity for you to get something better. They say 70% of adults prefer an email address which includes their names, so here’s your chance to get your name without a string of numbers attached.